Einstein/Tagore: Seashore of Endless Worlds opens in 1 month. This show WILL sell out.

Opens 9/14/12 for 6 performances. Tickets: $10, only in advance through the Fringe Festival website. No tickets will be sold in person at the door.

Opens 9/14/12 for 6 performances.  Tickets: $10, only in advance through the Fringe Festival website.  No tickets will be sold in person at the door.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Philadelphia, PA –  Shiva3 and Mangalam Dance are proud to announce the world premiere of Indian classical dance concert EINSTEIN/TAGORE: SEASHORE OF ENDLESS WORLDS at the 2012 Philly Fringe.   The 45-minute show will be performed at Twelve Gates Arts at 51 N. 2nd Street in Olde City for a total of 6 performances.

The show is a collection of original dance works that draws inspiration from Albert Einstein and Rabindranath Tagore‘s profound conversations in the late 1920s.  By combining a movement-based interpretation of their musings with inspiration from Tagore’s poetry and songs, her choreography explores human ties to the cosmos.  Her performance fuses the Bharatanatyam style of Indian classical dance with Tagore’s own Rabindra Nritya dance style, as well as modern dance.  The concert features collaborative performances with modern dancers Leslie Elkins and Jodi Aleen Obeid.

Bharatanatyam is one of the oldest dance forms in the world, originating in southern India some 3,000 years ago.  Originally performed in Hindu temples as a form of worship, this ancient dance style is celebrated today for its rhythmic, sculpturesque movements and use of hand gestures and facial expressions to convey a narrative.

Tagore was the greatest poet of modern Indian literature and one of India’s most influential thinkers.  In 1913 he became the first Asian to win the Nobel Prize for his poetry book Gitanjali.  This prolific Bengali writer authored over one thousand poems, a dozen plays and novels, and numerous essays on philosophy, education and religion.  Tagore was a celebrated composer, and set many of his poems to his own original tunes resulting in the music style known as Rabindra Sangeet, or “Rabindranath songs.”  He also created an entirely new dance form known as Rabindra Nritya, or “Rabindranath dance,” which broke away from traditional Indian classical forms, focusing instead on a more naturalized expression of emotions.  Tagore was highly educated, widely traveled, and well-versed in both Western and Eastern thought.  He took a great interest in science, particularly biology.

In 1926, Tagore met with Einstein in Berlin.  They began a years-long series of intellectually and spiritually riveting dialogues about science and spirituality.  Their meetings spanned continents and garnered considerable press.  A New York Times photo of the two featured the caption A Mathematician and a Mystic Meet in Manhattan. The accompanying article described Tagore as “the poet with the head of a thinker” and Einstein as “the thinker with the head of a poet.”  The transcripts of their conversations portray a fascinating discourse on the purpose of existence and humanity’s connection to the Universe.

Their meetings were immortalized in Tel Aviv in 1961 on the 100th anniversary of Tagore’s birth, when a Tagore Street was named.  It intersects with Einstein Street so that their conversation can continue.

 

A Unique Location
Twelve Gates Arts (which refers to the fortified gates that walled many ancient cities such as Delhi, Lahore, Jerusalem, and Rhodes – inside of which lay the heart of each city’s art and culture, and which today offer perspectives on history and possibilities), established in 2011, is a non-profit organization based in Philadelphia.  Through a unique and thought-provoking atmosphere, Twelve Gates Arts (12G) aims to showcase international arts bound by the sensibilities of a diaspora identity, including the South Asian identity, to create and promote projects crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, and to educate the community about diaspora culture.

 

Leslie Elkins
Jodi Aleen Obeid

 

 

Listings Information
What: EINSTEIN/TAGORE:  SEASHORE OF ENDLESS WORLDS

When: Friday 9/14/12 @6:30pm, Saturday 9/15/12 @6:30pm, Sunday 9/16/12 @2pm, Thursday 9/20/12 @6:30pm, Friday 9/21/12 @6:30pm and Saturday 9/22/12 @2pm

Where:  Twelve Gates Arts, 51 N. 2nd Street, Philadelphia, PA.

Tickets: $10, purchased only in advance through the Fringe Festival website.  No tickets will be sold in person at the door.

###

Einstein/Tagore: Seashore of Endless Worlds ONSALE NOW

Philadelphia, PA – Shiva3 and Mangalam Dance are proud to announce the world premiere of Indian classical dance concert EINSTEIN/TAGORE: SEASHORE OF ENDLESS WORLDS at the 2012 Philly Fringe. The 45-minute show will be performed at Twelve Gates Arts at 51 N. 2nd Street in Olde City for a total of 6 performances.

Tickets: $10, only in advance through the Fringe Festival website.  No tickets will be sold in person at the door.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Philadelphia, PA –  Shiva3 and Mangalam Dance are proud to announce the world premiere of acclaimed Indian classical dance concert EINSTEIN/TAGORE: SEASHORE OF ENDLESS WORLDS at the 2012 Philly Fringe.   The 45-minute show will be performed at Twelve Gates Arts at 51 N. 2nd Street in Olde City for a total of 6 performances.

The show is a collection of original dance works that draws inspiration from Albert Einstein and Rabindranath Tagore‘s profound conversations in the late 1920s.  By combining a movement-based interpretation of their musings with inspiration from Tagore’s poetry and songs, her choreography explores human ties to the cosmos.  Her performance fuses the Bharatanatyam style of Indian classical dance with Tagore’s Rabindra Nritya dance style, as well as modern dance.

The concert also features collaborative performances with modern dancers Leslie Elkins and Jodi Aleen ObeidLeslie is an Associate Professor of Dance at Rowan University and author of Body-Presence: Lived Experience of Choreography and PerformanceJodi is a contemporary dance artist and movement educator.  She is a professor of Dance at Rowan University and recently finished a new dance theater performance “The House of Empty” produced by the nEW Festival in Philadelphia.

Bharatanatyam is one of the oldest dance forms in the world, originating in southern India some 3,000 years ago.  Originally performed in Hindu temples as a form of worship, this ancient dance style is celebrated today for its rhythmic, sculpturesque movements and use of hand gestures and facial expressions to convey a narrative.

Tagore was the greatest poet of modern Indian literature and one of India’s most influential thinkers.  In 1913 he became the first Asian to win the Nobel Prize for his poetry book Gitanjali.  This prolific Bengali writer authored over one thousand poems, a dozen plays and novels, and numerous essays on philosophy, education and religion.  Tagore was a celebrated composer, and set many of his poems to his own original tunes resulting in the music style known as Rabindra Sangeet, or “Rabindranath songs.”  He also created an entirely new dance form known as Rabindra Nritya, or “Rabindranath dance,” which broke away from traditional Indian classical forms, focusing instead on a more naturalized expression of emotions.  Tagore was highly educated, widely traveled, and well-versed in both Western and Eastern thought.  He took a great interest in science, particularly biology.

In 1926, Tagore met with Einstein in Berlin.  They began a years-long series of intellectually and spiritually riveting dialogues about science and spirituality.  Their meetings spanned continents and garnered considerable press.  The New York Times article “A Mathematician and a Mystic Meet in Manhattan” described Tagore as “the poet with the head of a thinker” and Einstein as “the thinker with the head of a poet.”  The transcripts of their conversations portray a fascinating discourse on the purpose of existence and humanity’s connection to the Universe.

A Unique Location
Twelve Gates Arts (which refers to the fortified gates that walled many ancient cities such as Delhi, Lahore, Jerusalem, and Rhodes – inside of which lay the heart of each city’s art and culture, and which today offer perspectives on history and possibilities), established in 2011, is a non-profit organization based in Philadelphia.  Through a unique and thought- provoking atmosphere, Twelve Gates Arts (12G) aims to showcase international arts bound by the sensibilities of a diaspora identity, including the South Asian identity, to create and promote projects crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, and to educate the community about diaspora culture.

 

 

Jodi Aleen Obeid
Leslie Elkins

 

Listings Information
What: EINSTEIN/TAGORE:  SEASHORE OF ENDLESS WORLDS

When: Friday 9/14/12 @6:30pm, Saturday 9/15/12 @6:30pm, Sunday 9/16/12 @2pm, Thursday 9/20/12 @6:30pm, Friday 9/21/12 @6:30pm and Saturday 9/22/12 @2pm

Where:  Twelve Gates Arts, 51 N. 2nd Street, Philadelphia, PA.

Tickets: $10, purchased only in advance through the Fringe Festival website.  No tickets will be sold in person at the door.

###

Happy 150th, Tagore

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="266" caption="Tagore Celebration in Kolkata, 5/8/10"][/caption]

Rabindranath Tagore (May 8, 1861 – August 8, 1941)  the first Asian to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, was born 150 years ago this weekend.  Celebrations are underway in India, especially in his hometown of Kolkata, West Bengal, and across the globe.  Would that I were there

Tagore Celebration in Kolkata, 5/8/10

Rabindranath Tagore (May 8, 1861 – August 8, 1941)  the first Asian to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, was born 150 years ago this weekend.  Celebrations are underway in India, especially in his hometown of Kolkata, West Bengal, and across the globe.  Would that I were there.

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A few of my pix from the historic Tagore family home Jorasanko, winter 2010, Kolkata.

I had the pleasure of visiting the Tagore family home, Jorasanko, earlier this year, which continued to turn me on to this Bengali Renaissance Man’s works in poetry, theatre, fiction and music.  Today Jorasanko is a museum operated by nearby Rabindra Bharati University named in Rabindranath’s honor and focusing on performing arts and the humanities.  My fellow travelers and I were fortunate to have a personal tour guide at Jorasanko, music faculty Prof. Ghosh.  He also took me to visit the campus and meet with the Performing Arts chair and some of the faculty, and I wound up giving an impromptu lecture and Q&A about contemporary US theatre to the bright, informed and eager undergrads in an Ancient Greek Theatre class.

The visit to Jorasanko and the university campus wound up indirectly turning me on to the works of Tagore’s precursors such as Ishwar Chandra Gupta (1812-1859), largely forgotten today in Tagore’s long shadow.

I leave you with one of Tagore’s poems:

Leave this chanting and singing and telling of beads!
Whom dost thou worship in this lonely dark corner of a temple with doors all shut?
Open thine eyes and see thy God is not before thee!

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*

He is there where the tiller is tilling the hard ground and where the pathmaker is breaking stones.
He is with them in sun and in shower, and his garment is covered with dust.
Put off thy holy mantle and even like him come down on the dusty soil!

*

 

 

 

Deliverance? Where is this deliverance to be found?
Our master himself has joyfully taken upon him the bonds of creation;
he is bound with us all for ever.

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*

*

Come out of thy meditations and leave aside thy flowers and incense!
What harm is there if thy clothes become tattered and stained?
Meet him and stand by him in toil and in sweat of thy brow.

 *

*

*

The above poem is very Walt Whitman, eh?  It’s from Tagore’s Nobel-winning collection Gitanjali.

Rabindranath Tagore statue at the entrance to Rabindra Bharati University, winter 2010, Kolkata.
Einstein and Tagore in Berlin, July 14, 1930

[pix taken from indiablooms.com and schoolofwisdom.com; the rest are mine]